Setting sail and returning home. Research voyaging in Aotearoa

Main Article Content

Rosalina Richards http://orcid.org/0000-0002-3716-811X
Justine Camp
Jesse Kokaua
Terina Raureti
Albany Lucas
Darcy Karaka
Hannah Rapata
Michael Lameta

Keywords

Pacific, Pasifika, Maori, indigenous research, migrant research, research methodology

Abstract

We are drawn to this Talanoa in response to the call from Pacific Health Dialogue for frank and open discussion. Our contribution to the conversation is some reflections about our experience of academic health research as a collective of Māori and Pacific researchers trying to navigate within a large national research programme. Alongside this we will share the voyaging framework we developed to help locate ourselves as a collective, and articulate our needs and aspirations as early to mid-career researchers.


Our collective met in the context of working with A Better Start – E tipu e rea, a National Science Challenge created by the New Zealand government.1 Better Start focuses on the health of children and young people across five key areas; healthy weight, resilient teens, successful literacy and learning, big data and Vision Mātauranga. Our team came together as collaborators within the Big Data theme, to explore the Integrated Data Infrastructure (IDI) as an area of possibility and challenge for both Māori and Pacific communities.

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